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Why it's used

Ascorbic acid is used for the short-term treatment of lack of vitamin C (scurvy) in adult and children aged five months and older for whom oral use is not possible, should not be used, or insufficient. It is a prescription medicine. This medicine works by restoring the body pool of ascorbic acid.
When not to use
Ascorbic acid will not work to treat deficiency of vitamin C that is not related to symptoms of scurvy.
Water-Soluble Vitamins
Ascorbic acid belongs to a class of medicines called Water-Soluble Vitamins. Water-soluble vitamins include vitamin C and all of the vitamin B complex that performs vital functions in a variety of body system and is crucial for maintaining optimal health.

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How to use

Read the directions on the product label, patient guide, or medicine guide provided by the medicine company or your pharmacist before starting to use Ascorbic acid. If you have any questions related to this medicine, ask your doctor or pharmacist. Consume this medicine as recommended by your doctor.
Ascorbic acid is consumed with food. The tablet and capsule form of Ascorbic acid should be swallowed with a full glass of water.

Typical Dosage

The typical dose of Ascorbic acid is 500 mg to 1000 mg daily for scurvy treatment and 200 to 500 mg daily for preventive therapy. The usual dose for children is 100 mg to 300 mg daily for scurvy treatment and 30 mg daily for preventive therapy. The maximum adult dose of Ascorbic acid is 500 mg to 1000 mg daily for scurvy treatment and 200 to 500 mg daily for preventive therapy in a day. This medicine is typically used for a period of 7 days for lack of vitamin C. It takes 3 weeks for this medicine to start to work.
This medicine should be used on an as-needed basis.
If you are using the chewable tablet form of this medicine, make sure you chew the medicine before you swallow it.
Mix 200 mg of Ascorbic acid (equivalent to 0.4 mL of Ascorbic acid) and 7.5 mL of sterile water for injection to produce an infusion solution with an estimated osmolarity of 290 mOsmol/L.
If using the liquid form of this medicine, measure the dose using the provided measuring cup, spoon, or dropper. Before pouring the medicine into the measuring device, you should check the measurement markings carefully. Then, pour the dose amount into the device. After use, clean and store the measuring device in a safe place for your next use. You should not use a tablespoon or teaspoon as the dose measuring devices since it can result in an incorrect dose. If indicated on the product package, shake the medicine before use.

Talk to Your Doctor

Talk to your doctor if your condition persists. Tell your doctor if diarrhea, upset stomach, increased urination, and stone in the kidney, if urine is acidic. If you have any kidney disease, the dose of the Ascorbic acid should be reduced in patients with kidney dysfunction.

Use in Children

If you are giving Ascorbic acid to a child, be sure to use a product that is meant for children. Before giving this medicine to a child, use the child's weight or age to find the right dose from the product package. You can also read the dosage section of this page to know the correct dose for your child. Else, consult with your doctor and follow their recommendation.

Avoid Alcohol

Avoid the consumption of alcohol with Ascorbic acid.

Storage

You should store Ascorbic acid at 2° to 8°C (36° to 46°F), away from moisture, and protect from light. Store the medicine away from the reach of children and pets.
Medicines may be prescribed for uses other than those listed in the medicine guide. Do not use Ascorbic acid for conditions for which it was not prescribed. Do not give Ascorbic acid to other people who might have the same conditions or symptoms that you have. Self-medication may harm them.

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How to take Ascorbic acid

The dose and frequency of using Ascorbic acid will depend on the following factors:
  • age of the patient
  • patient's health
  • the health of the patient's liver
  • medicines recommended by the doctor
  • any other medicines being used
  • response to the medicine

Ascorbic acid Dosage

Dosage for lack of vitamin C (scurvy)

Adult
  • Recommended: 500 mg to 1000 mg daily for scurvy treatment and 200 to 500 mg daily for preventive therapy
Children (aged 5 months to less than 12 months)
  • Recommended: 50 mg once daily
Children (aged 1 year to less than 11 years)
  • Recommended: 100 mg once daily
Children (aged 11 years and older)
  • Recommended: 200 mg once daily

Minimum Age

5 months

Dosage calculation for children

To calculate the dosage for children please use the weight based dose calculator to calculate the appropriate dosage as per the weight of your child.

Forms

Injection
Strength: 500 mg/1ml
Liquid
Strength: 500 mg
Powder
Strength: 1250 mg
Solution
Strength: 500 mg
Tablet
Strength: 5.7mg, 100 mg, 125 mg, 250 mg, 300 mg
Tablet extended release
Strength: 1000 mg

Special Instructions

Injection
Each vial contains 25,000 mg of Ascorbic acid and the highest recommended single dose is 200 mg. Do not give the whole contents of the vial to an individual patient. The Ascorbic acid should be diluted before giving through the veins.

Missed Dose

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember it. Skip the missed dose if it is time for the next dose. Avoid taking a double dose to make up for the missed dose.

Overdose

What to do if you overdose on Ascorbic acid?
If overdose of Ascorbic acid occurs, instantly discontinue the use of Ascorbic acid and treat symptoms of overdose, avoid additional intake of Ascorbic acid.
Symptoms of an overdose of Ascorbic acid
If you use too much of this medicine, it could lead to dangerous levels of the medicine in your body. In such cases, symptoms of an overdose may include:
If you think you have overdosed on Ascorbic acid, call a poison control center immediately. You can look up the poison control center information from the Poison Center Finder at TabletWise.com.

Precautions while using Ascorbic acid

Before you use Ascorbic acid, tell your doctor of your medical and health history including the following:
  • elderly patients
  • kidney disease
  • oxalate associated kidney failure
  • oxalate kidney stone
  • patient with glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency
  • smoking
Using a high dose of Ascorbic acid for prolonged time results in acute and long-term kidney failure associated with oxalate and may cause blood cells to break up.
Before you use Ascorbic acid, discuss with your doctor if you are allergic to it or its ingredients. Your doctor may prescribe an alternative medicine and update your medical records to record this information.
The use of this medicine may change leukocyte count. The use of Ascorbic acid may lead to inaccurate results due to negative impact on leukocyte count.
The use of Ascorbic acid may change nitrite and bilirubin levels. The levels of bilirubin and nitrite get affected by the use of Ascorbic acid.
The use of this medicine may change blood or urine sugar levels. These levels get negatively impacted due to Ascorbic acid.

Use in Pregnancy

Consult with your doctor on the use of Ascorbic acid during pregnancy, or if you are planning to become pregnant. The large dose of Ascorbic acid (greater than 1000 mg daily) should not be given to pregnant women since the result of large doses on the fetus is unknown.

Use while Breastfeeding

The use of Ascorbic acid is known to be safe for use in women who are breastfeeding. Ascorbic acid may pass into breast milk, but there is no proof of any risk to the baby.

Use while Conceiving

Consult with your doctor on the use of Ascorbic acid, if you are trying to conceive.

Side-effects in Older Patients

Ascorbic acid may cause increased incidence of side-effects in older patients. Elderly patients may see an increased risk of kidney failure associated with oxalate deposition.

Side-effects in Children

Ascorbic acid may cause an increased risk of side-effects in children. Children using this medicine may see an increased risk of kidney failure associated with oxalate deposition.

Long-term Use

Long term use of Ascorbic acid may result in the development of acute or long-term oxalate nephropathy.

What precautions should be taken during Pregnancy and Nursing, and administering Ascorbic acid to Children or the Older Adults?

Pregnant Women

Only When Necessary
Warning: Before using Ascorbic acid in pregnant women, it is advised to consult the doctor. The large dose of Ascorbic acid (dose greater than 1000 mg daily) should not be given to pregnant women since the result of large doses on the fetus are unknown.

Breastfeeding

Only When Necessary
Warning: Before using Ascorbic acid in breastfeeding women, it is advised to consult the doctor. Ascorbic acid may pass into breast milk, but there is no proof of any risk to the baby.

Younger Adults Population

Precaution
Warning: The safety profile of Ascorbic acid in children is the same as in adults. Children below two years may have a higher risk of kidney failure that is associated with oxalate deposition (oxalate nephropathy).

Older Adults Population

Possibly safe
Warning: Elderly patients may experience an increased risk of kidney failure that is associated with oxalate deposition while treatment with Ascorbic acid.

Ascorbic acid Side-effects

The following side-effects may commonly occur when using Ascorbic acid. If any of these side-effects worsen or last for a long time, you should consult with your doctor:
  • pain at the site of infusion
  • swelling at the site of infusion
The following side-effects may commonly occur in older patients on the use of Ascorbic acid. Discuss with your doctor if any of these side-effects last for a long time or are severe:
  • kidney injury with oxalate deposits
Rarely, the use of Ascorbic acid may cause the following side-effects:
The following severe side-effects may also occur when using Ascorbic acid:
  • Kidney disorders
    Symptoms: excessive urinary excretion of oxalate formation of kidney stones if your urine is acidic
    If any of these symptoms occur, contact your doctor right away.
  • Stomach and intestinal disorders
    Symptoms: diarrhea
    If this happens, consult with your doctor.
Your doctor has prescribed Ascorbic acid because they judge that the benefit is greater than the risk posed by side-effects. Many people using this medicine do not have serious side-effects. This page does not list all possible side-effects of Ascorbic acid.
If you experience side-effects or notice other side-effects not listed above, contact your doctor for medical advice. You may also report side-effects to your local food and drug administration authority. You can look up the drug authority contact information from the Drug Authority Finder at TabletWise.com.

Side-effects and Allergic Reactions of Ascorbic acid by Severity and Frequency

Common Side-effects

Following are the common side-effects of this medicine:
  • pain at the site of infusion
  • swelling at the site of infusion

Infrequent and Rare Side-effects

Following are the infrequent and rare side-effects of this medicine:

Severe Side-effects

Following are the severe side-effects of this medicine:

Side-effects in Older Adults

Following are the side-effects of this medicine in elderly patients:
  • oxalate nephropathy
If you experience side-effects or notice other side-effects not listed above, contact your doctor for medical advice. You may also report side-effects to your local food and drug administration authority. You can look up the drug authority contact information from the Drug Authority Finder at TabletWise.com.

Warnings

Laboratory Test Interference

Ascorbic acid may interfere with laboratory tests depend on oxidation-reduction reactions, including bilirubin and nitrite levels, urine and blood glucose testing, and leukocyte count testing. Laboratory tests if possible should be delayed until 24 hours after Ascorbic acid infusion.

Rupture of Red Blood Cells (Hemolysis)

Patients with glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency may be at greater risk for severe red blood cells rupture during therapy with Ascorbic acid. Hemolysis has been seen with the use of Ascorbic acid in such patients. Carefully monitor blood count and hemoglobin level. The reduced dose of Ascorbic acid should be used in these patients. Discontinue treatment with Ascorbic acid if hemolysis is doubted and treat as required.

Oxalate Nephropathy and Kidney Stones

Patients with kidney disease including kidney damage, history of oxalate kidney stones, elderly patients, and children less than two years may be at greater risk while having Ascorbic acid treatment. Acute and long-term oxalate deposits with kidney injury have been seen with prolonged use of high doses of Ascorbic acid. Urine acidification by Ascorbic acid may cause precipitation of cysteine, urate or oxalate stones. Monitor functioning of kidneys in these patients while receiving Ascorbic acid.

Interactions with Ascorbic acid

When two or more medicines are taken together, it can change how the medicines work and increase the risk of side-effects. In medical terms, this is called as a Drug Interaction.
This page does not contain all the possible interactions of Ascorbic acid. Share a list of all medicines that you use with your doctor and pharmacist. Do not start, stop, or change the dose of any medicines without the approval of your doctor.

Anticoagulant

Ascorbic acid interacts with Anticoagulant such as warfarin, which is used for the treatment of blood clot. No effects have been observed in patients on warfarin dose treated with Ascorbic acid doses up to 1000 mg per day for two weeks. Regular monitoring for drugs that increase the blood clotting time should continue during Ascorbic acid therapy, as per the pattern of care.

Amphetamine & Other Drugs

There may be an interaction of Ascorbic acid with amphetamine, which is used to treat excessive sleepiness, sleep paralysis or obesity, and drugs affected by urine acidification. Ascorbic acid may acidify the urine and reduce the blood levels of amphetamine by improving kidney excretion. In case of reduced amphetamine efficiency discontinue use of Ascorbic acid. Also, acidification of urine by Ascorbic acid will change the excretion of some drugs affected by the pH of the urine when used in combination. Standard monitoring of treatment is warranted.

Antibiotics

Ascorbic acid may interact with Antibiotics such as kanamycin or doxycycline, which are used for treating bacterial infections. Ascorbic acid may reduce the activities of kanamycin, erythromycin, doxycycline, streptomycin, and lincomycin. Ascorbic acid inactivates bleomycin in vitro. If the antibiotic effectiveness is assumed to be reduced by the combined use of Ascorbic acid, discontinue Ascorbic acid use.

Oral contraceptives

Your doctor's guidelines may need to be followed while taking this medicine along with Oral contraceptives, which are used to prevent unwanted pregnancy. The use of oral contraceptives may reduce the blood levels of Ascorbic acid.

Laboratory Test Interference

Special instructions need to be followed while taking this medicine along with Laboratory test interference. Ascorbic acid may interfere with various laboratory tests based on the oxidation-reduction reactions (e.g., glucose, bilirubin levels, etc.). Ascorbic acid may lead to incorrect results obtained for checking urinary or blood levels, nitrite, leukocytes, and bilirubin if tested within or during 24 hours after infusion.

Chelating Agent

Ascorbic acid may interact with a chelating agent such as desferrioxamine, which is used to remove excess iron or aluminum from the body. Ascorbic acid given in addition to desferrioxamine in patients with an excessive amount of iron to achieve sufficient iron excretion may worsen the toxic effect of iron, especially to the heart. Ascorbic acid should not be given in combination with desferrioxamine in patients with improper functioning of the heart.

Interactions of Ascorbic acid by Severity

Serious

The following medicines may interact when taken together and can cause harmful effects in the body. Please consult with your doctor or pharmacist before taking these medicines together.

Moderate

The following medicines may interact when taken together and can increase your risk of harmful effects. Please consult with your doctor or pharmacist before taking these medicines together.

When should Ascorbic acid be not used?

Recurrent Kidney and Bladder Stones

Patients with excessive urinary excretion of oxalate which may lead to formation of kidney and bladder stones should not use Ascorbic acid.

Traveling With Medication

  • Ensure that you carry enough doses of each of your prescription medicines to last the entire trip. The best place to store your medicines is in the carry on baggage. However, while flying, if carrying liquid medicines, make sure you do not go over the limits imposed for carry-on liquids.
  • While traveling overseas, make sure that you can carry each of your prescription medicines legally to your destination country. One way to ensure this is by checking with your destination country's embassy or website.
  • Make sure that you carry each of your medicines in their original packaging, which should typically include your name and address, and the details of the prescribing doctor.
  • If your travel involves crossing time zones, and you are required to take your medicine as per a fixed schedule, make sure that you adjust for the change in time.

Expired Medication

Taking a single dose of expired Ascorbic acid is unlikely to cause a side-effect. However, please discuss with your doctor or pharmacist, if you feel unwell or sick. An expired medicine may become ineffective in treating your prescribed conditions. To be on the safe side, it is important not to use an expired drug. You are much safer by always keeping a fresh supply of unexpired medicines.

Safe Disposal of Medication

  • If there are disposal instructions on the package, please follow the instructions.
  • If there are medicine take-back programs in your country, you should contact the respective authority to arrange for the disposal of the medicine. For example, in the USA, the Drug Enforcement Administration regularly hosts National Prescription Drug Take-Back events.
  • If there are no take-back programs, mix the medicine with dirt and place them in a sealed plastic bag. Throw the plastic bag in your household trash. Separately, remove all personal information including the prescription label from the medicine packaging and then dispose off the container.
  • If specifically indicated on the medicine package that it needs to be flushed down the toilet when no longer needed, perform the required step.
This page provides information for Ascorbic acid .
Vitamin deficiency
Vitamin C
Cold
Infectious Diseases

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